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MamaBear
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Unread postby MamaBear » Sun Apr 09, 2017 6:30 am

GunChleoc wrote:Source of the post I recommend that you don't mix the two languages as a beginner - it will only confuse you. You wouldn't try learning French and Spanish at the same time, now would you? Don't let the similarity of the languages' names fool you. :)

Best join http://www.daltai.com/, they will be in a much better position to help you :)


Thanks for the suggestion!
Driver picks the music, shotgun shuts his cake hole.

x95lee
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Unread postby x95lee » Tue Jul 18, 2017 2:49 am

Halò everyone,

Is mise Tom Lee, tha mi à Atlanta, Georgia. Tha mi toilichte ur coinneachadh.

I am a beginner still struggling with where to start. There are few opportunities to learn here in Georgia. Although Skype and other internet options exist, I learn best speaking in-person. There are no opportunities to speak with fluent speakers here.

The starting point I've chosen is "Scottish Gaelic in Twelve Weeks," by Ian MacAonghuis and Roibeard ' Maolalaigh. But retention is an issue.

Has anyone found learning the phonetics of Scottish Gaelic helpful as an early step to achieve fluency? I've found with German and Japanese that once I understand how words and sentences sound, learning how to speak is easier.

Does anyone have any tips for beginners (with no access to fluent speakers)?

It is a pleasure to meet others interested in learning the language. I love the sound of ghaidhlig, its history, and the idea of keeping a beautiful and important language alive.

Tioraidh,
Tom

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GunChleoc
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Unread postby GunChleoc » Tue Jul 18, 2017 8:47 am

Fàilte chridheil ort! :)

Yes, starting with the sounds is an excellent idea. Understanding how they are organized is very important for understanding the grammar and orthography. Have a look at http://akerbeltz.org/index.php?title=Pr ... _dhuilleag for a description of the sound system. The same author has also written a book that is a lot more in-depth with exercises http://www.akerbeltz.eu/books.html.

For native speaker access, you could try a long-distance course with http://gaelicacademy.ca/ or http://smo.uhi.ac.uk/. There is also an American ogranization that might be able to help you http://www.acgamerica.org/.
Oileanach chànan chuthachail
Na dealbhan agam

x95lee
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Unread postby x95lee » Wed Jul 19, 2017 4:15 am

Tapadh leibh! I think "Blas na Gàidhlig" will be my next investment. Very good reviews online, and includes sound files. And it merits your attention.

Torn b/w Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and AGA. On one hand, AGA appears to be less expensive, but on the other Sabhal Mòr Ostaig is based in the Highlands as opposed to Canada. Is there a dialect difference b/w ghaidhlig taught at a Canadian institution and Skye? I wouldn't know. Inclined towards Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, but suspect a negligible difference b/w the two.

In any case, mòran taing!

Tom

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GunChleoc
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Unread postby GunChleoc » Thu Jul 20, 2017 12:03 pm

You will always be faced with different dialects, and which one you get always depends on your particular teacher. So, pick what's more convenient for you :)
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Na dealbhan agam

SeumasKY
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Unread postby SeumasKY » Thu Oct 12, 2017 4:06 am

"S mise Seumas. Tha mi a' fuireach ann an Kentucky anns na S. A. Agus tha mi toilichte a bheil an fòram sin againn.

faoileag
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Unread postby faoileag » Thu Oct 12, 2017 11:51 pm

Fàilte, a Sheumais! :-)

Tha sinn toilichte d' fhaicinn an seo. :-)

Nach sgrìobh thu rudeigin anns na fòraman? :-)

We're happy to see you here. Won't you write something in the forums?

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Unread postby GunChleoc » Sun Oct 15, 2017 7:00 pm

Fàilte chridheil ort! :D
Oileanach chànan chuthachail

Na dealbhan agam

Greum66
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Unread postby Greum66 » Mon Oct 16, 2017 10:26 pm

Hi all, to my shame I’ve sorta kinda almost lost my spoken Gaelic ... long story but in essence was actively discouraged from speaking it by my parents ... That said when I was with my grandparents that is all I spoke ...
I have enjoyed reading the posts on here as it does make me think “how would I say that” if that “ I hope that makes sense
Anyways I can sympathise with some of the learners from here as to pronunciation and dialects as I do have a dialect lol and where I am now they know as soon as I speak I’m not from here lol... the older folks usually can place me and it make me smile ... as they usually say he speaks funny Gaelic lol ...
sorry for the ramble but I have noticed that there are a few post on dialect etc ... I did at first get very confused until my ear got in tune with the different pronunciation lol
Anyways to all learners keep plugging away and don’t get hung up on which is right and which is wrong as there is no right and wrong (ok in grammar there is lol) just remember that very many native speakers are that speakers and might not read or write Gaelic ...

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Unread postby faoileag » Tue Oct 17, 2017 1:03 am

Fàilte, a Ghreum66!

Great that you're finding your way back to what you had in your early years. :D

And that's a good reminder, about native-speakers not always being very confident with reading and writing - that does indeed make them understandably wary of eager learners, as some on here have noted.

Cum ort! :-)

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Unread postby GunChleoc » Tue Oct 17, 2017 6:53 pm

Fàilte chridheil ort is mòran taing airson a' bhrosnachaidh :)
Oileanach chànan chuthachail

Na dealbhan agam


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