How do I say "I love you too"?

Ciamar a chanas mi.... / How do I say...
Laura
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How do I say "I love you too"?

Unread postby Laura » Mon Jul 10, 2017 11:19 pm

Hi!

I'm a student from Finland trying to learn a little Gaelic, after being inspired to do so last year when I was on exchange in Glasgow.

Could someone please help me with the following:

How do I say "I love you too" when saying it to my mother (in case there are any differences between saying it to you parents and your partner)? I tried to look it up online but people seemed to have different opinions on the exact tr*nsl*t**n.

Many thanks in advance!



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GunChleoc
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How do I say "I love you too"?

Unread postby GunChleoc » Tue Jul 11, 2017 10:07 am

"Me too" is usually said using the Gaelic word for "and"

Is toigh leam cofaidh - is toigh agus/is leamsa.

So, it all depends on how the first phrase is said. In this particular case, we might deviate, because the thing being loved is not identical. So:

Tha gaol agam ort - Tha gaol agam ort cuideachd. Or maybe: Tha agus/is gaol agam ortsa.
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Níall Beag
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How do I say "I love you too"?

Unread postby Níall Beag » Tue Jul 11, 2017 5:10 pm

Would you need to repeat "gaol" if using "agus"? Wouldn't "tha agus agam ortsa" do the trick?

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GunChleoc
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How do I say "I love you too"?

Unread postby GunChleoc » Wed Jul 12, 2017 9:14 am

Grammar-wise, it would, but it felt unnatural to me, i.e. the references are too hard to decode for the listener. Of course, I'm not a native speaker.
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