<![CDATA[Fòram na Gàidhlig]]> https://www.foramnagaidhlig.net/foram 2018-10-22T12:19:44+02:00 Smartfeed Extension for phpBB 3.1 <![CDATA[Cuir nan aithne / Introductions :: Feasgar math :: Author geidheal]]> 2018-10-08T01:41:57+02:00 2018-10-08T01:41:57+02:00 https://www.foramnagaidhlig.net/foram/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=3242&p=23512#p23512 <![CDATA[Cuir nan aithne / Introductions :: Feasgar math :: Reply by GunChleoc]]> 2018-10-09T14:28:27+02:00 2018-10-09T14:28:27+02:00 https://www.foramnagaidhlig.net/foram/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=3242&p=23515#p23515 http://geidh.uk/

Fàilte chridheil ort agus chan eil e gu diofar dhuinn dè do ghnè :D]]>
http://geidh.uk/

Fàilte chridheil ort agus chan eil e gu diofar dhuinn dè do ghnè :D]]>
<![CDATA[Cuir nan aithne / Introductions :: Halò! :: Author wenom]]> 2018-10-08T23:47:47+02:00 2018-10-08T23:47:47+02:00 https://www.foramnagaidhlig.net/foram/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=3243&p=23513#p23513
    Halò, Is mise wenom! Ciamar a tha sibh an-diugh? I'm very new to the language, but I love it so much, I'd love to keep learning and meet new people too! I've been teaching myself using a few different websites (mainly learn gaelic and gaelic word a day - though that hasn't been updated since february this year...)

    Despite living in Scotland, I think my biggest challenge will be actually practising speaking since I don't know anyone else who speaks the language.

    (I'm afraid I have no clue how to add lenition to my name, any help would be greatly appreciated!)
]]>
    Halò, Is mise wenom! Ciamar a tha sibh an-diugh? I'm very new to the language, but I love it so much, I'd love to keep learning and meet new people too! I've been teaching myself using a few different websites (mainly learn gaelic and gaelic word a day - though that hasn't been updated since february this year...)

    Despite living in Scotland, I think my biggest challenge will be actually practising speaking since I don't know anyone else who speaks the language.

    (I'm afraid I have no clue how to add lenition to my name, any help would be greatly appreciated!)
]]>
<![CDATA[Cuir nan aithne / Introductions :: Halò! :: Reply by GunChleoc]]> 2018-10-09T14:30:08+02:00 2018-10-09T14:30:08+02:00 https://www.foramnagaidhlig.net/foram/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=3243&p=23516#p23516
Tha mi gu dòigheil, tapadh leat!

w doesn't exist in Gaelic, so your name can't be lenited ;)]]>

Tha mi gu dòigheil, tapadh leat!

w doesn't exist in Gaelic, so your name can't be lenited ;)]]>
<![CDATA[Cuir nan aithne / Introductions :: Halò! :: Reply by faoileag]]> 2018-10-11T23:57:01+02:00 2018-10-11T23:57:01+02:00 https://www.foramnagaidhlig.net/foram/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=3243&p=23518#p23518
I see you live in Moray. There is a Gaelic teaching centre in Nairn, and depending how far from Inverness you are, there are lots of Gaelic events, get-togethers, music etc on there from time to time.

https://moraylanguagecentre.weebly.com/
https://en-gb.facebook.com/pages/catego ... 427193702/]]>

I see you live in Moray. There is a Gaelic teaching centre in Nairn, and depending how far from Inverness you are, there are lots of Gaelic events, get-togethers, music etc on there from time to time.

https://moraylanguagecentre.weebly.com/
https://en-gb.facebook.com/pages/catego ... 427193702/]]>
<![CDATA[Gràmar, Fuaimean is Gnàths / Grammar, Sounds and Expressions :: How are vowel sounds with acute accents written now that acute accents aren't used in Gaelic? :: Reply by Polygot2017]]> 2018-09-22T16:20:59+02:00 2018-09-22T16:20:59+02:00 https://www.foramnagaidhlig.net/foram/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=3239&p=23505#p23505
GunChleoc wrote:Qr Bbpost They are written with a grave accent.


Ok. The thing is, the letter 'e' with a grave accent is pronounced like 'ay' in the word 'say', whereas with a grave accent it's pronounced more like 'ai' in the word 'fair'. Similarly, the letter 'o' with an acute accent is pronounced like 'owe', whereas with a grave accent it's pronounced 'au' like in the word 'caught'. So if Gaelic now uses grave accents in place of the old acute accents, how would you be able to tell which form of 'e' or 'o' is being used?]]>
GunChleoc wrote:Qr Bbpost They are written with a grave accent.


Ok. The thing is, the letter 'e' with a grave accent is pronounced like 'ay' in the word 'say', whereas with a grave accent it's pronounced more like 'ai' in the word 'fair'. Similarly, the letter 'o' with an acute accent is pronounced like 'owe', whereas with a grave accent it's pronounced 'au' like in the word 'caught'. So if Gaelic now uses grave accents in place of the old acute accents, how would you be able to tell which form of 'e' or 'o' is being used?]]>
<![CDATA[Gràmar, Fuaimean is Gnàths / Grammar, Sounds and Expressions :: How are vowel sounds with acute accents written now that acute accents aren't used in Gaelic? :: Reply by akerbeltz]]> 2018-09-22T17:30:10+02:00 2018-09-22T17:30:10+02:00 https://www.foramnagaidhlig.net/foram/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=3239&p=23506#p23506 You have to know which is which but that's worse that it sounds. /ɛ:/ and /o:/ are quite rare, probably less than 20 common words have either. So basically, once you know which words used to have ó and è, then assuming everything else is /ɔ:/ and /e:/. There's a list in Blas na Gàidhlig somewhere, I forget which page.]]> You have to know which is which but that's worse that it sounds. /ɛ:/ and /o:/ are quite rare, probably less than 20 common words have either. So basically, once you know which words used to have ó and è, then assuming everything else is /ɔ:/ and /e:/. There's a list in Blas na Gàidhlig somewhere, I forget which page.]]> <![CDATA[Gràmar, Fuaimean is Gnàths / Grammar, Sounds and Expressions :: Using Ann for Exists :: Author AlexAkimov]]> 2018-10-07T11:11:59+02:00 2018-10-07T11:11:59+02:00 https://www.foramnagaidhlig.net/foram/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=3241&p=23509#p23509
* Tha an t-uisge ann : Rain is existing = there is rain = It is raining
* Tha bùth ann : A shop is existing = There is a shop

Very handy structure, but I'm a bit unclear when it comes to extending beyond the above, such as with the following 2 examples:

* There is a shop in Biggar
* There is a shop on our street

I think these 2 phrases could work with or without the "exists" ie.

* Tha bùth ann ann am Biggar OR Tha bùth ann am Biggar
* Tha bùth ann air an t-sràid againn OR Tha bùth air an t-sràid againn

My question is is there a right and a wrong time to use the ann for existence. The above examples work without it and the "ann ann" looks a bit clunky. Would these examples sound different to a Gaelic ear? I like the ann for existence concept but would worry about overusing it.]]>

* Tha an t-uisge ann : Rain is existing = there is rain = It is raining
* Tha bùth ann : A shop is existing = There is a shop

Very handy structure, but I'm a bit unclear when it comes to extending beyond the above, such as with the following 2 examples:

* There is a shop in Biggar
* There is a shop on our street

I think these 2 phrases could work with or without the "exists" ie.

* Tha bùth ann ann am Biggar OR Tha bùth ann am Biggar
* Tha bùth ann air an t-sràid againn OR Tha bùth air an t-sràid againn

My question is is there a right and a wrong time to use the ann for existence. The above examples work without it and the "ann ann" looks a bit clunky. Would these examples sound different to a Gaelic ear? I like the ann for existence concept but would worry about overusing it.]]>
<![CDATA[Gràmar, Fuaimean is Gnàths / Grammar, Sounds and Expressions :: Using Ann for Exists :: Reply by jeltzz]]> 2018-10-07T12:27:25+02:00 2018-10-07T12:27:25+02:00 https://www.foramnagaidhlig.net/foram/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=3241&p=23510#p23510
The double 'ann ann' is not such a problem, it might look a little odd in writing, but if I were saying "Tha bùth ann ann am Biggar" these would be grouped together as two phrases, with a slight pause between the two: "Tha bùth ann.. ann am Biggar", with a bit of emphasis falling on the first "ann".]]>

The double 'ann ann' is not such a problem, it might look a little odd in writing, but if I were saying "Tha bùth ann ann am Biggar" these would be grouped together as two phrases, with a slight pause between the two: "Tha bùth ann.. ann am Biggar", with a bit of emphasis falling on the first "ann".]]>
<![CDATA[Gràmar, Fuaimean is Gnàths / Grammar, Sounds and Expressions :: Using Ann for Exists :: Reply by AlexAkimov]]> 2018-10-07T12:42:46+02:00 2018-10-07T12:42:46+02:00 https://www.foramnagaidhlig.net/foram/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=3241&p=23511#p23511 <![CDATA[Gràmar, Fuaimean is Gnàths / Grammar, Sounds and Expressions :: Using Ann for Exists :: Reply by GunChleoc]]> 2018-10-09T14:25:57+02:00 2018-10-09T14:25:57+02:00 https://www.foramnagaidhlig.net/foram/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=3241&p=23514#p23514 Tha bùth air an t-sràid againn

Those constructions are enough to denote that it's there, so no extra "ann " is needed]]>
Tha bùth air an t-sràid againn

Those constructions are enough to denote that it's there, so no extra "ann " is needed]]>
<![CDATA[Gràmar, Fuaimean is Gnàths / Grammar, Sounds and Expressions :: Using Ann for Exists :: Reply by Níall Beag]]> 2018-10-13T15:17:18+02:00 2018-10-13T15:17:18+02:00 https://www.foramnagaidhlig.net/foram/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=3241&p=23519#p23519 English is the other extreme, saying there must always be there is/are for existential. However, centuries ago you would have been looked at funny for saying "there's a house there", because you're saying "there" twice, or for saying "there's a house here", because you should make up your mind -- is it there or here?

Gaelic's in between. If something exists, it must exist somewhere. "ann" in this case is the "it" of places. I'm not specifying where -- you know where I'm talking about, so I don't need to. If I tell you explicitly where it is, I don't say "there".

This, like many things, is changing under the influence of English, but as a learner, I focus on conservative forms and use them until I find that nobody else does.]]>
English is the other extreme, saying there must always be there is/are for existential. However, centuries ago you would have been looked at funny for saying "there's a house there", because you're saying "there" twice, or for saying "there's a house here", because you should make up your mind -- is it there or here?

Gaelic's in between. If something exists, it must exist somewhere. "ann" in this case is the "it" of places. I'm not specifying where -- you know where I'm talking about, so I don't need to. If I tell you explicitly where it is, I don't say "there".

This, like many things, is changing under the influence of English, but as a learner, I focus on conservative forms and use them until I find that nobody else does.]]>
<![CDATA[Faclaireachd / Lexicography :: Lus a' chrom-chinn: stress? :: Reply by ithinkitsnice]]> 2018-09-22T20:23:28+02:00 2018-09-22T20:23:28+02:00 https://www.foramnagaidhlig.net/foram/viewtopic.php?f=27&t=3240&p=23507#p23507 :mhoire:]]> :mhoire:]]> <![CDATA[Faclaireachd / Lexicography :: Lus a' chrom-chinn: stress? :: Reply by Droigheann]]> 2018-09-22T23:44:29+02:00 2018-09-22T23:44:29+02:00 https://www.foramnagaidhlig.net/foram/viewtopic.php?f=27&t=3240&p=23508#p23508 <![CDATA[Faclaireachd / Lexicography :: uamhraidh (fearful / gloomy) :: Author Droigheann]]> 2018-10-09T22:52:07+02:00 2018-10-09T22:52:07+02:00 https://www.foramnagaidhlig.net/foram/viewtopic.php?f=27&t=3244&p=23517#p23517 inducing fear, as in "tubaist uamhraidh - fearful accident" or only for, well, full of fear.

Which of course also makes me wonder about the "gloomy" sense - could "seòmar/cusbair/suidheachadh 7c7c uamhraidh - gloomy room/subject/situation &c&" and "duine uamhraidh - gloomy man" all be used, or is only the latter natural Gaelic and the former unnatural Anglicisms?]]>
inducing fear, as in "tubaist uamhraidh - fearful accident" or only for, well, full of fear.

Which of course also makes me wonder about the "gloomy" sense - could "seòmar/cusbair/suidheachadh 7c7c uamhraidh - gloomy room/subject/situation &c&" and "duine uamhraidh - gloomy man" all be used, or is only the latter natural Gaelic and the former unnatural Anglicisms?]]>