Bonjour from Paris

Cò thusa? / Introduce yourself
Shorio
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Location: Paris

Bonjour from Paris

Unread post by Shorio » Mon Mar 18, 2013 11:51 am

Halo, is mise Tony !

And this is the only thing that I can say in Gàidhlig :lol:
First sorry if my English is bad sometimes, I have to improve it ! Don't hesitate to correct me, it must helps me :D

Well, my name is Tony, I'm 17 years old and I live near Paris. Since I'm a child I'm totally fond of history, and during the 2 past years especially the Scottish's history. My dream is now to live in Scotland, teaching French. Your country is fabulous, I envy you. At first my goal was to live in Edinburgh, but I changed a bit my mind and I thought "Why not in other cities, farther from the continent ?". So I did some research, and now this is where I'm here : next summer, ~june 2014, I will make a trip, crossing the isle of Lewis & Harris by feet, sleeping in the nature and sometimes at people's home (if they are not scared of me :mc: ). This trip will allow me to grow old, and also to investigate about Gàidhlig. I find this language totally awesome, pleasant to listen, and full of history ... Well at the end of my trip I will make a report about Gàidhlig. I want to learn Gàidhlig, and I don't want it to disappear ...

Well I'm glad to join your community, I try to learn Gàidhlig for my part but it seems hard for a French (latin) native ... I hope I will improve my language skill (English AND Gàidhlig) with you ! :D
Oh by the way, if some of you want to learn French, ask me ! It would be a pleasure to help you :farmad:



GunChleoc
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Re: Bonjour from Paris

Unread post by GunChleoc » Mon Mar 18, 2013 12:59 pm

Fàilte! Bienvenu! :smeid:

Your English is pretty good. Better than my French anyway :D
Oileanach chànan chuthachail
Na dealbhan agam

Shorio
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Location: Paris

Re: Bonjour from Paris

Unread post by Shorio » Mon Mar 18, 2013 1:13 pm

Tapadh leat !

I'm totally lost in the board because I don't speak Gàidhlig at all, but I will spend a lot of time in the bilangual section to learn some useful expressions :)

Raghnaid NicGaraidh
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Re: Bonjour from Paris

Unread post by Raghnaid NicGaraidh » Mon Mar 18, 2013 1:27 pm

Feasgar math! 'S mise Raghnaid NicGaraidh. Je suis nouvelle dans ce forum aussi. J'ai aussi dix-sept ans. Je suis australienne mais je parle le français et l'allemande (despuis quatre ans) et l'espagnol (despuis un ans)... et l'anglais, bien sûr! J'apprende le gaélique despuis trois semaines. Sorry about the terrible French! My Gàidhlig is worse.

Shorio
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Re: Bonjour from Paris

Unread post by Shorio » Mon Mar 18, 2013 1:36 pm

Tapadh leat !

Sorry but what "Feasgar math" means ? I began Gàidhlig yesterday, so ... :farmad:
Et ton français est bon ne t'inquiète pas :)

Do you recommend me some topics of the board to learn the basis of the language ?

Thrissel
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Re: Bonjour from Paris

Unread post by Thrissel » Mon Mar 18, 2013 9:17 pm

Fàilte!

feasgar math = good afternoon/evening
Shorio wrote:I try to learn Gàidhlig for my part but it seems hard for a French (latin) native ...
You'll find it has advantages as well. For example, you aready know that everything is either masculine or feminine, unlike the poor Anglo-Saxons who think that they can talk about almost everything as "it" :priob:

What are you learning from? We have links to some good resources on this page
http://www.foramnagaidhlig.net/index.php?page=2

GunChleoc
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Re: Bonjour from Paris

Unread post by GunChleoc » Mon Mar 18, 2013 9:58 pm

@Raghnaid: Da Du Deutsch kannst, empfehle ich Dir mal das Lehrbuch der Schottisch-Gälischen Sprache von Michael Klevenhaus. Er betreibt auch ein Lernerform, falls Du Dich hier mal langweilen solltest :lol: http://www.schottisch-gaelisch.de/
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faoileag
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Re: Bonjour from Paris

Unread post by faoileag » Mon Mar 18, 2013 10:20 pm

Fàilte, Shorio!
:D

I think your English is certainly good enough to follow the simple topics in the bilingual section, and we are very international here - if you have problems asking a question in English, try it in French - I'm sure between us we wll manage to understand and answer!
We have lots of non-English native speakers here, so don't worry!

Bienvenue - ne t' inquiète pas! Nous essayons de t' aider! :P

Màiri na Coille
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Re: Bonjour from Paris

Unread post by Màiri na Coille » Tue Mar 19, 2013 1:44 am

Fàilte, a Thony! :D

I'm a history-loving child too--Scottish history in particular, of course. :priob: Right now I'm teaching myself Gàidhlig for a language class (I'm homeschooled), but next year I might take French at the public high school. I'd want to keep working on my Gàidhlig, too though.

Yes, us poor Anglo-Saxons. I'm never going to figure out this gender thing. :roll:

Raghnaid NicGaraidh
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Re: Bonjour from Paris

Unread post by Raghnaid NicGaraidh » Tue Mar 19, 2013 3:39 am

Tony - "feasgar math" s'appelle "bon soir" - it's anything after noon (midday). "Madainn mhath" is the morning and "feasgar math" is the afternoon and evening - it was late evening for me when I wrote it.

Well, English is my native language but I've learn other languages with the gender thing before... The thing that's confusing me in Gàiidhlig is that the article isn't different depending on the gender, it's always 'an' and changes to 'am' because of the consonant that the noun starts with, rather than its gender. From what I can figure, the only way to tell is whether the adjective has been aspirated (as in, feasgar math but madainn mhath and glè mhath).

Shorio
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Re: Bonjour from Paris

Unread post by Shorio » Tue Mar 19, 2013 8:01 am

Well ... Madainn mhath agus apadh leibh !

Was I right ? :mhoire:

Thanks everyone for you messages, and thanks for the link Thrissel ! I'm learning from an "old" website ( http://fidlopez.perso.neuf.fr/gaelique/verbe.htm ), too bad that there is actually like ... 1 french website to learn Gàidhlig :gulach:

GunChleoc
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Re: Bonjour from Paris

Unread post by GunChleoc » Tue Mar 19, 2013 9:28 am

Thanks for the link! I've scrambled what remains of my French and put it on our main site :)

The article does change with the gender, but it also heavily depends on the sound the next word starts with
http://www.foramnagaidhlig.net/index.php?page=149
http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaidhlig/ionns ... CG/12.html
Oileanach chànan chuthachail
Na dealbhan agam

Neas Olc
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Re: Bonjour from Paris

Unread post by Neas Olc » Tue Apr 09, 2013 5:36 pm

Fàilte!

I actually speak French (Canadian) and can confirm that the grammar is pretty different than any Celtic language- that said there are at least a handful of Latinised words in the vocab that should be sort of familiar (madainn for one, also the days of the week). Bon courage!

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