Cait' Caite/ bheil

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clarsach
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Cait' Caite/ bheil

Unread postby clarsach » Sat Mar 09, 2019 4:00 am

Hi,

Can someone explain cait' vs caite (where?) and when to use bheil vs using a bheil?

My lesson book has cait/caite in the dictionary at the back but only ever uses cait' that I can see. Is this just shortening the word, as we do in English with contractions? They never explain, that I can find.


Also, I see phrases at many places around the internet using

cait a bheil,
caite a bheil, and
caite bheil.

When and how would each of these properly be used? What exactly is the difference?

tapadh leat!



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GunChleoc
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Cait' Caite/ bheil

Unread postby GunChleoc » Sun Mar 10, 2019 9:10 pm

Yes, it's a bit like contractions. In "Càite a bheil", the 2 sounds that I underlined are pronounced the same, so they usually get pulled into one.

Càite bheil is an unusual spelling for it though, Càit' a bheil is the usual way to spell it.
Oileanach chànan chuthachail
Na dealbhan agam

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clarsach
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Cait' Caite/ bheil

Unread postby clarsach » Mon Mar 11, 2019 2:46 am

Thank you, GunChleoc. That's what I figured.

Any explanation for cait a bheil, caite a bheil, and caite bheil? Is it all pretty much the same thing, just different spellings to account for that similar sound of caite a bheil? Typos? Or an actual difference in meaning?

Many thanks for your help.

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Cait' Caite/ bheil

Unread postby Níall Beag » Tue Mar 12, 2019 10:43 pm

They are all different renderings of the same thing, just as GunChleoc says.

Basically, as both the "a" and the "e" are weak, they're pronounced the same way, and you'll only hear one of them.

People who write "caite a bheil" are thinking "they're both there, even if they sound like one sound".
People who write "cait' a bheil" are thinking "there's only one sound, so I'm only writing one sound, and if I don't write the a, the grammar won't be clear".
People who write "caite bheil" are possibly thinking "there's only one sound, so I'm only writing one sound, and if I write cait' a then I'm going to be using just as much space, so why bother?"

People, basically, never agree on anything. ;-)