Fàgail vs falbh for 'leaving', is there any difference?

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Polygot2017
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Fàgail vs falbh for 'leaving', is there any difference?

Unread postby Polygot2017 » Fri Jun 14, 2019 9:36 am

Hi all. I have a question about the verb 'to leave' in Gàidhlig (well, technically not the infinitive, but the verbal noun 'leaving'). Sometimes I've seen 'fàgail', whereas other times I've seen 'falbh'. For example:

Feumaidh mi falbh - I have to leave

Bidh mi a’ fàgail an taighe aig cairteal gu naoi - I leave the house at quarter to nine

So is there are any difference between the two, or are they basically interchangeable? Would it be possible to switch these 2 sentences around so they become?....

Feumaidh mi a’ fàgail

Bidh mi a’ falbh an taighe aig cairteal gu naoi



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akerbeltz
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Fàgail vs falbh for 'leaving', is there any difference?

Unread postby akerbeltz » Fri Jun 14, 2019 10:50 am

There has to be an object with fàgail. Think of it as "leave something" i.e. a' fàgail Glaschu, fàg an sashimi ud... but falbh doesn't need one i.e. tha mi a' falbh and can't actually take one unless you slap it on with a prep i.e. a' falbh leis a' ghaoith.

Polygot2017
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Fàgail vs falbh for 'leaving', is there any difference?

Unread postby Polygot2017 » Fri Jun 14, 2019 12:06 pm

akerbeltz wrote:Source of the post There has to be an object with fàgail. Think of it as "leave something" i.e. a' fàgail Glaschu, fàg an sashimi ud... but falbh doesn't need one i.e. tha mi a' falbh and can't actually take one unless you slap it on with a prep i.e. a' falbh leis a' ghaoith.


So do they both mean leaving in the sense of physically leaving a place? What about leaving something behind, e.g 'I left my bag at the house' etc, or is there a different verb in Gàidhlig for that?

I'm still not quite sure what you mean when you say 'falbh' needs a prep in order to have an object with it. Which preps do you mean, and can you give me an example with the sentence 'Bidh mi a’ falbh an taighe aig cairteal gu naoi' (which I presume is incorrect because there's no prep with it?) ?

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Fàgail vs falbh for 'leaving', is there any difference?

Unread postby GunChleoc » Fri Jun 14, 2019 12:20 pm

Exactly, this has to be 'Bidh mi a’ fàgail an taighe aig cairteal gu naoi' or 'Bidh mi a’ falbh on taigh aig cairteal gu naoi'

Use "fàg" for "leaving behind". "falbh" also works for "go away".
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Fàgail vs falbh for 'leaving', is there any difference?

Unread postby faoileag » Sun Jun 16, 2019 12:40 am

Falbh is leave, depart, go off, set out, take off - no direct object.

Dh'fhalbh mi aig 9m.

Lots of common idiomatic uses, e.g.
na bliadhnaichean a dh'fhalbh - years gone by
Tha Calum a' falbh le Catrìona - C. is going (out) with C.
Bha mo sporan air falbh - my purse was gone!
Dh'fhalbh iad gus caraidean fhaicinn. went (off) to see friends (often translates the English "go")
Dh'fhalbh iad uile a Chanada. - went (off) to C.

(You can add any sensible preposition, eg bho, le, a, to get a prepositional object - if you call it that - but no direct or "accusative" object. As soon as you have that, you need fàg.)

Fàg is leave behind - a place, an object, a person.

Dh'fhàg iad Glaschu / an taigh / na caraidean.
Dh'fhàg mi am baga agam air a' bhus.

Common idiom : air fhàgail - left over.
Cha robh ach criomagan air fhàgail. (Or formally, air am fàgail.) There were only crumbs left over.
Chan eil mòran air fhàgail - there's not much/many left.