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Words or names?

Posted: Wed Feb 19, 2020 5:16 pm
by Larissa
I'm looking at the quarries on Easedale Island and trying to understand the names a bit more without just looking up the answer. I think some might be place names but I'm a bit stuck. Can anybody help? It's just for interest as I am visiting.

Quarry Name (tr*nslation) (pronunciation)

Craig na h-uamha ( rock? cave?) (cry? na hoo-ava)

Creag an Dun (rock/cliff ...? ) (crake an doon)

An Toll mor Thicath (the big hole ...?) (an tole more ...?)

An lub chlear (The clear? pool) (an loo-p ...?)

Creag Rubha nam Faoileann (rock/cliff point if? gull)(crake roo-er num fer-lom)

An Staca Dhubh (The black Stack) ( An stacka doo)

Klondyke - Just as is?

Re: Words or names?

Posted: Thu Feb 20, 2020 11:12 pm
by GunChleoc
Some spelling mistakes... it will make more sense without them:

Creag na h-uamha
Creag an dùin
An toll mòr...

"nam" in this case is the genitive plural of the article, you can tr*nsl*t* it as "of the" here.

I can't say much about the English transliterations, since English spelling is highly ambiguous for English itself already.

Re: Words or names?

Posted: Fri Feb 21, 2020 10:10 pm
by Larissa
The spelling mistakes were not mine. I copied the names from this Glasgow University Thesis .. http://theses.gla.ac.uk/4391/2/1999WalshPhD2.pdf.

I now have the correct translations. Creag apparently meant quarry on Easdale and some words are English words with gaelic spellings like clear/chlear.

Creag na h-Uamha (quarry of the cave)

Creag an Dùin (quarry of the hill)

An Toll mar Thuath (the northward hole)

An Lub Chléar (the clear pool)

Creag Rubha nam Faoileann (quarry at the headland of the seagulls)

An Staca Dhubh (the black cliff)

Klondyke - Just as is?

Re: Words or names?

Posted: Sun Feb 23, 2020 8:00 pm
by faoileag
Klondyke, a river in the Yukon, was symbolic of the Canadian gold rush.
A century later the word Klondyker came to be used for Russian and East European fish-factory ships that regularly visited the Scottish west coast fishing harbours, chasing the to them big money to be made from mass processing, canning and freezing the rich hauls of fish (herring, mackerel) caught there.

History
http://www.ullapool-harbour.co.uk/about-us/history/

article 1993
https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/t ... 07229.html

I imagine the Easdale quarry name is related to these ships.