Is this how you would say ...

Ciamar a chanas mi.... / How do I say...
GunChleoc
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Unread post by GunChleoc » Sat Jan 31, 2009 10:30 pm

Nach fhaigh mise fear?
And I don't get one? :P


Oileanach chànan chuthachail
Na dealbhan agam

misslily
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Unread post by misslily » Sat Jan 31, 2009 10:59 pm

How unforgivably selfish of me - of COURSE you get one back! :priob: That was uncharacteristically thoughtless of me, and I do apologize ... I shall strive to never be so careless again.

Do you forgive me - one more time? :?:

misslily
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So ... I was wondering ...

Unread post by misslily » Sun Feb 01, 2009 9:18 am

I've recently learned I'm going to become a grandmother - (ackk!!)

My daughter lives far away, and so we're communicating via e-mail most of the time ... and in discussing the imminent birth, we keep saying "the baby" all the time. It's occurred to me that there is probably a more meaningful and somewhat charming Gaelic colloquialism for "baby" or "unborn child" or such ... (we think she's having a girl, but the ultra-sound could be misleading). I just think saying the word "the baby" all the time is beginning to sound rather sterile ... :mc:

So I was wondering how I could introduce a different way to refer to the the first leaf of my daughter's branch of our family tree without it sounding so clinical?? Does anyone have some suggestions??

Much obliged ...

Seonaidh
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Unread post by Seonaidh » Sun Feb 01, 2009 12:42 pm

The classic English term for an unborn person is "sprog". According to SMO's Stòr-Dàta Briathrachais, a female baby or infant is "bìodag": however, without the sràc on the i it seems to mean "dagger". The old Briathrachas didn't have an equivalent for "sprog": maybe in Dwelly's...

akerbeltz
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Unread post by akerbeltz » Sun Feb 01, 2009 2:54 pm

In Gaeldom you can use the name of pretty much any young animal to refer to a child, such as isean (chick) or cuilean (puppy).

I have never seen references to talking about unborn children much apart from stating the mother is expecting a child. I'm not aware of such a thing in Gaeldom but in many societies there are taboos surrounding talking too much about unborn children or even giving them names before they are older than a year or 5 for the fear of attracting "evil influences" at a stage when the baby is not "mature". It may well have been the case that you didn't "do that" in Gaelic either.

horogheallaidh
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Unread post by horogheallaidh » Sun Feb 01, 2009 10:26 pm

what about "leanabh" for baby? also use "paiste" but i reckon that means an infant - ie older than a leanabh

misslily
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Unread post by misslily » Sun Feb 01, 2009 10:56 pm

Wow ... these are all great suggestions!

Thanks, everybody!! I wonder how these things are pronounced? Although, typing them into an e-mail, I'm safe enough to not have to pronounce them ... for a time, anyway.

I'm not finding Gaelic a very easy language to learn - but I'm trying! :)

Stìophan
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Unread post by Stìophan » Tue Feb 10, 2009 11:35 am

leanabh = Lenn-av
pàiste = Pahsh-chah (ch as in 'church')
isean = eesh-an
cuilean = kool-an (with slender 'l')

The 'a' in the second syllable is like the 'e' in 'the', or 'a' in about, although in cuilean it's a clearer short 'ah' sound.

Hope that helps :)

misslily
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Unread post by misslily » Tue Feb 10, 2009 3:17 pm

Indeed, this helps quite a lot, actually. Thank you very much! (What an unusual language, so far ...)

:D

Seonaidh
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Unread post by Seonaidh » Tue Feb 10, 2009 9:59 pm

Gaelic? Unusual? Ciamar a chanas tu "unusual"? - dè seorsa "u", dè seorsa "s"? Tha Beurla "unusual" nach eil?

Stìophan
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Unread post by Stìophan » Tue Feb 10, 2009 11:33 pm

'S e annasach a' Ghàidhlig a th'air 'unusual'. :priob:

Annasach is the Gaelic for 'unusual'

When you're learning any language you will tend to find it unusual - English (to a learner of the language) is definitely unusual!

Neas Olc
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Unread post by Neas Olc » Wed Feb 11, 2009 10:39 pm

Tha Gàidhlig gu math àbhaisteach ri taobh Latin. (Dè tha Gàidhlig air "Latin" is "compared to/in comparaison to"? Cha d'fhuair mi iad 'san fhaclair).

I absolutely HATE the stòr-dàta Briathrachas dictionary. It gives you the verb root and not the verbal noun, expecting you to magically geuss the verbal noun which is not always possible. I'd kill for an alternative dictionary that's actually, you know, useful.

faoileag
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Unread post by faoileag » Wed Feb 11, 2009 11:23 pm

I presume you mean an ONLINE dictionary that does that? (The print ones tend to give both forms.)

Try the wonderful Dwelly online - eg look up 'compare' Beurla gu Gàidhlig, and you get (among other things) samlaich, a' samhlachadh, or look up coimeas, another possible tr*nsl*t**n given, in Faclair air fad (or G. gu B.) and you get all sorts of variations on it.


www.dwelly.info

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