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Sgrìobh 'sa Ghàidhlig is Beurla / Write in Gaelic and English
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faoileag
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Unread post by faoileag » Thu Jun 05, 2008 4:19 pm

That is exactly what is happening.


OK, then I personally would be more generous in my interpretation of the quality of the homework. You can, if you feel ypu must, always have a quick look in the dictionary to check accents etc.

It 's important not to be over-critical of the teacher or you will undermine the child's confidence in him/her, which will have a very negative effect both on the learning and on the class atmosphere.

This one means 'There is a big floor in the room'. The accents are all correct.

The verb always comes first in Gaelic - that doesn't make it a question.



darkside
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Unread post by darkside » Thu Jun 05, 2008 4:37 pm

faoileag wrote:
That is exactly what is happening.




It 's important not to be over-critical of the teacher or you will undermine the child's confidence in him/her, which will have a very negative effect both on the learning and on the class atmosphere.
I wasnt being critical of the teacher, the teacher couldnt do more to help the kids, this just basically to help them remember the words they learned in class.

darkside
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Unread post by darkside » Thu Jun 05, 2008 6:32 pm

GunChleoc wrote:Good point, faoileag. Good teachers are always hard to come by, even in ideal circumstances.
neoni wrote:here's a good dictionary - http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaidhlig/faclair/sbg/lorg.php
but it won't be much good unless you have a strong grasp on the grammar
You might find my beginner's guide to finding stuff in the Stòr-Dàta useful.
thank you for this, moran taing

faoileag
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Unread post by faoileag » Thu Jun 05, 2008 7:53 pm

darkside wrote: I wasnt being critical of the teacher, the teacher couldnt do more to help the kids, this just basically to help them remember the words they learned in class.
I wasn't saying you were - in fact it was more the others spontaneously reacting with dismay that I was thinking of, maybe making you yourself less confident in the teacher - just wanted to say I personally think it best to handle these things tactfully. :)
Really good that you're getting involved - that's the best support you can give a learning child! :D

darkside
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Unread post by darkside » Thu Jun 05, 2008 8:58 pm

faoileag wrote:
darkside wrote: I wasnt being critical of the teacher, the teacher couldnt do more to help the kids, this just basically to help them remember the words they learned in class.
I wasn't saying you were - in fact it was more the others spontaneously reacting with dismay that I was thinking of, maybe making you yourself less confident in the teacher - just wanted to say I personally think it best to handle these things tactfully. :)
Really good that you're getting involved - that's the best support you can give a learning child! :D
its the courses i need to do me thinks, just to get up to speed on the whole she bang

darkside
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Unread post by darkside » Mon Jun 09, 2008 3:48 pm

Todays sentence is

Shad an cat càl air a' làr

I shall put my response up when i work it out.

Right i cant find Shad anywhere this is what ive came up with tho.

"their cat and cabbage are on the floor"
Last edited by darkside on Mon Jun 09, 2008 3:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.

neoni
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Unread post by neoni » Mon Jun 09, 2008 3:51 pm

the cat threw cabbage on the floor


gaelic absurdism?
'neònachd'?

darkside
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Unread post by darkside » Mon Jun 09, 2008 3:57 pm

so does shad mean throw then?

neònachd - gle neònachd,

but if it helps me and my child i am gle mhath, could do with somewhere with the phonetics as well tho.

neoni
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Unread post by neoni » Mon Jun 09, 2008 4:00 pm

shad is the past tense of sad, with means to throw

shad is pronounced exactly like the english word "hat"

darkside
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Unread post by darkside » Mon Jun 09, 2008 4:06 pm

slainte zero, first time ive came across it.

neoni
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Unread post by neoni » Mon Jun 09, 2008 4:09 pm

'tilg' is a wee bit more common for "throw" i think, people don't like using one syllable verbs

pronounced "chi lik" (ch as in chance, there)

darkside
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Unread post by darkside » Mon Jun 09, 2008 4:12 pm

neoni wrote:'tilg' is a wee bit more common for "throw" i think, people don't like using one syllable verbs

pronounced "chi lik" (ch as in chance, there)
mind of information you are

eideard
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Unread post by eideard » Mon Jun 09, 2008 4:46 pm

Darkside - a little hint. Whenever you see a Gaelic word with an "h" in it, such as shad, take the h out before you look the word up in the dictionary. The word you will find is "sad" meaning throw. To form the past tense of this, and most other verbs, just add the "h". You get shad, which means threw.

Look up "coisich"in your dictionary. It means walk. Put in the "h" giving you choisich which is the past tense, meaning walked. The point is, you won't find "choisich" in the dictionary, only "coisich. OK ?

darkside
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Unread post by darkside » Mon Jun 09, 2008 5:55 pm

eideard wrote:Darkside - a little hint. Whenever you see a Gaelic word with an "h" in it, such as shad, take the h out before you look the word up in the dictionary. The word you will find is "sad" meaning throw. To form the past tense of this, and most other verbs, just add the "h". You get shad, which means threw.

Look up "coisich"in your dictionary. It means walk. Put in the "h" giving you choisich which is the past tense, meaning walked. The point is, you won't find "choisich" in the dictionary, only "coisich. OK ?
got it now eideard moran taing, but the dictionay i looked shad up in wasnt even there as sad, its the dictionay entitled abair! by renton & mcdonald

neoni, do i know you from another site?

*Alasdair*
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Unread post by *Alasdair* » Mon Jun 09, 2008 7:11 pm

darkside wrote:
eideard wrote:Darkside - a little hint. Whenever you see a Gaelic word with an "h" in it, such as shad, take the h out before you look the word up in the dictionary. The word you will find is "sad" meaning throw. To form the past tense of this, and most other verbs, just add the "h". You get shad, which means threw.

Look up "coisich"in your dictionary. It means walk. Put in the "h" giving you choisich which is the past tense, meaning walked. The point is, you won't find "choisich" in the dictionary, only "coisich. OK ?
got it now eideard moran taing, but the dictionay i looked shad up in wasnt even there as sad, its the dictionay entitled abair! by renton & mcdonald

neoni, do i know you from another site?
I have this dictionary and if you look up what neoni said, tilg, you will find the verb "to throw". As she said, tilg is the more commonly used original word.
Sad is more modern i think.

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