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Re: Ciamar a tha an t-sìde / How's the weather?

Posted: Thu Jan 23, 2020 1:27 pm
by getracey
Bha i gu math ceòthach an seo ann an Cuimrigh a tuath madainn an-diugh, ach tha i grianach a-nis.

It was foggy here in North Wales this morning, but it is sunny now.

Re: Ciamar a tha an t-sìde / How's the weather?

Posted: Thu Jan 23, 2020 8:38 pm
by GunChleoc
anns a' Chuimrigh a Tuath / sa Chuimrigh a Tuath

Re: Ciamar a tha an t-sìde / How's the weather?

Posted: Mon Feb 10, 2020 12:21 pm
by getracey
Bha i gaothach gu leòr agus fluich anns a' Chuimrigh a Tuath an-dé.

It was very windy and wet in North Wales yesterday.

Re: Ciamar a tha an t-sìde / How's the weather?

Posted: Mon Feb 10, 2020 12:41 pm
by Níall Beag
getracey wrote:
Mon Feb 10, 2020 12:21 pm
Bha i gaothach gu leòr agus fluich anns a' Chuimrigh a Tuath an-dé.

It was very windy and wet in North Wales yesterday.
Oedd hi'n wyntog iawn a gwlyb yn y Gogledd ddoe.

This raises an interesting point of grammar. In English "very windy and wet" works OK, and the word "very" applies to the full phrase "wet and windy" -- ie "very (wet and windy)". If you only want the "very" to apply to one, the best approach is to add another adverb (eg. very wet and quite windy), but you could also switch the order (windy and really wet). I definitely prefer two adverbs.

I was brought up Anglophone, so I'm a learner of both Gaelic and Welsh, but to me it feels like the phrase "very windy and wet" doesn't really tr*nsl*t* cleanly into either. My gut says "very" only applies to one, and it feels... I don't know... asymmetrical? unbalanced?... to have "(glè ghaothach) agus (fliuch)" or "(wyntog iawn) a (gwlyb)".

Re: Ciamar a tha an t-sìde / How's the weather?

Posted: Mon Feb 10, 2020 11:24 pm
by getracey
Tapadh leibh Niall Beag, a diolch am eich ymateb tairieithog!
I did hesitate before posting as I wasn't sure if gu leòr applied to both the wind and the rain. I was trying for some thing similar to a slightly ironic lt was windy and wet enough" however maybe I should stick to basics for now! In spoken Welsh I would be happy to say "roedd hi'n ddigon gwyntog a gwlyb ddoe" as tone of voice and body language would help convey meaning. I would probably use either two adverbs or a different way of expressing myself in written Welsh, because of the unbalanced or asymmetrical feeling you mentioned.
Bha sneachd ann feasgar an-diugh
It snowed this afternoon

Re: Ciamar a tha an t-sìde / How's the weather?

Posted: Wed Feb 19, 2020 2:11 pm
by GunChleoc
What about "glè ghaothach fliuch"? It would clearly apply to both then