Careers in Gaelic

Càil sam bith eile / Anything else
Caoimhin.MacGilliosa
Posts: 60
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2008 2:01 pm
Language Level: Beginner
Location: Aonghas, Alba

Careers in Gaelic

Unread postby Caoimhin.MacGilliosa » Thu Jan 03, 2008 6:14 pm

Hello Folks,

Sorry for writing in English but my gaelic is very basic at this present moment.

I was wondering if anyone could help me with some information as such, I'm going to start the Introduction course at Sabhal Mor Ostaig in Feb called I hope my Gaelic is ok "An Cursa t-inntrigidh" and then possibly going on by how well or not so well I am doing in this couse will consider studying Gaelic further possibly to degree level.

Does anyone know how long it would take to continue to finish a degree program in Gaelic? I think once the intro course is finished it is then onto another 1year course and then I think the Degree program.

Is it possible for a career in the Gaelic field with the intro course and HE-Dip Course. I am 25years old at present and would like to be looking for work before I turn 30 in the Gaelic field if this happened, I would be interested i both media and working directly with working with youngsters, does anyone know of any folk that have gone on from having no gaelic to working in the gaelic area?

I can also speak Icelandic of which is a germanic language more than an celtic language but they also use the word "Bord" meaning table amongst others.

HAHA maybe I should consider learning English better before posting such a complex question, sorry if this going all over the place - I have no idea how I'm not getting this out right Cool but basically

a) what types of careers are there for learners of gaelic with a few years education under their belt?
b) does anyone on the board work with Gaelic on day to day issues?
c) any additional info would be great

thanks for your help and sorry for confusing everyone.



*Alasdair*
Posts: 507
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2007 6:11 pm
Language Level: Gu math siubhalachd
Corrections: I'm fine either way
Location: Alba
Contact:

Unread postby *Alasdair* » Thu Jan 03, 2008 6:47 pm

Hey :) I am hoping to go to SMO in September to do a degree. It takes 4 years (As per usual in this country).

Here is info about getting onto degree courses:

You can get onto the Cùrsa Comais with only one Higher so yes you would
be able to complete the Cùrsa Comais - which is the first year of the
degree programme, and then continue onto second year after that. If you
were applying straight onto a degree then you would need 3 Highers but
in the end you can complete the 3 / 4 years with only 1 Higher. It is
quite strange how it works but basically you can get onto the An Cùrsa
Comais and then continue with the degree courses with only one Higher.


I am doing the one higher way hopefully :) You would finish An Cùrsa Inntrigigh and then do An Cùrsa Comais then follow on the way the info ays :)

As for job prospects:

Teacher
Classroom helper
Tourist board
Shops in the Highlands (Western Isles mainly)
Bòrd na Gàidhlig
CLI
Church
Ministry
Government
Local councils
TV
Radio
Books (Novel/Poetry)
Anything else where Gaelic is used day to day, which despite what people say is quite a lot of things :)

As for your level of Gaelic for An Cùrsa Inntrigigh - It doesn't need to be high, almost non-exsistant. For An Cùrsa Comais it needs to be of conversational level - They said i was almost there, just needed to be a bit more fluent - I have been learning since April 1st (8 months!). As long as you can understand and speak Gaelic well An Cùrsa Comais should be OK as it is done entirely through Gaelic. An Cùrsa Inntrigigh is English.

If you start now you will be done by the time you are 30 :) If you go into teaching (You need Higher English) you could be in teaching with a guaranteed job by the time you are 28/9.

Hope this has helped you out a bit :)

Mar sin leibh an-dràsta!

neoni
Posts: 634
Joined: Sun Oct 28, 2007 10:57 pm
Corrections: I'm fine either way
Location: am badeigin

Unread postby neoni » Thu Jan 03, 2008 7:26 pm

hallo a chaoimhin.
i'm on an cùrsa comais this year, and there are a couple people who have come having just done cursa inntrigidh, the course after that - cùrsa adhartais (they say..) is the same level as cùrsa comais, at the start at least. so in theory, you only need to have done cùrsa inntrigidh - mar a thuirt alasdair

i would strongly recommend (money permitting, i know it can be difficult) to do one of the short courses too. if you're not sure what level you would be at, they'll be happy to chat to you on the phone for a few minutes and assess you. i found that doing them made me feel really comfortable with just speaking gaelic for every day things, as opposed to just speaking it in the class.


co-dhiù, cum a' dol! :)

Caoimhin.MacGilliosa
Posts: 60
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2008 2:01 pm
Language Level: Beginner
Location: Aonghas, Alba

Unread postby Caoimhin.MacGilliosa » Thu Jan 03, 2008 9:16 pm

Hallo a neoni agus Alasdair,

Many thanks for your very helpful replies, alot of great information from both of you :D

I am hopefully looking to do Cursa Comais as well next year Alasdair if all things go well my introduction course, so we might have the chance to meet up in Skye and Neoni too.

How is life at the college? It really seems an interesting place and a small area, it always seems that there are lots of social events and such going on. Is it quite difficult to find a part-time job in Sleat or even up in Portree?

At present I'm studying in Iceland at the moment doing an Icelandic course(did a volunteer program in Reykjavik and decided to stay on for a year) but the more I develop my Icelandic It brings back to wanting to study Gaelic and move into that field.

Thanks again folks

:D

Níall Beag
Posts: 1333
Joined: Sun Sep 23, 2007 6:58 pm
Language Level: Chan eil gaidhlig agam agus cha bhi
Location: Dún Èideann, Alba
Contact:

Unread postby Níall Beag » Thu Jan 03, 2008 9:57 pm

What's your background? What are your interests? There is no "Gaelic field" to work in -- Gaelic is a language, not a field (note: I'm a learner myself, not getting at you here!). I'm always monitoring the jobs board on the Comunn na Gàidhlig page and I've never seen anything I'm qualified for. There's a massive range of jobs out there, and you need to give serious consideration to what field you want to work in.

neoni
Posts: 634
Joined: Sun Oct 28, 2007 10:57 pm
Corrections: I'm fine either way
Location: am badeigin

Unread postby neoni » Thu Jan 03, 2008 10:19 pm

Caoimhin.MacGilliosa wrote:How is life at the college? It really seems an interesting place and a small area, it always seems that there are lots of social events and such going on. Is it quite difficult to find a part-time job in Sleat or even up in Portree?


it's amazing up there, really good - but it's definitely not for everyone. another reason why the short courses are good, just to get a feel for it.

we do have a lot of concerts and plays and things, and the odd ceilidh every couple weeks, which are good. this year, there's a lot going on in the evening. german, shinty, karate, conversation circles, exercise classes etc - all through gaelic :) . also, because it's so small it is quite easy to organise things yourself - occasionaly people go up to the swimming pool in kyle and a few people went to iona recently.

there's a lot of part time work in the college itself. i work in the kitchen, and am managing to make about five times what i spend. there's at least one person who works in a bar in portree too, and a couple work in the pubs nearby.


sjáumst! :priob:

Caoimhin.MacGilliosa
Posts: 60
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2008 2:01 pm
Language Level: Beginner
Location: Aonghas, Alba

Unread postby Caoimhin.MacGilliosa » Thu Jan 03, 2008 11:09 pm

Níall Beag wrote:What's your background? What are your interests? There is no "Gaelic field" to work in -- Gaelic is a language, not a field (note: I'm a learner myself, not getting at you here!). I'm always monitoring the jobs board on the Comunn na Gàidhlig page and I've never seen anything I'm qualified for. There's a massive range of jobs out there, and you need to give serious consideration to what field you want to work in.


I would disagree and say there is a field to work in wth the advantage of having gaelic, if it's teaching adults, working in youth groups or tr*nsl*t*ng gaelic for a local government body. This is what I meant by "gaelic field" all various different areas of working but manily through the function of gaelic and my original question was meaning What type of jobs are going for folk who may not have a degree in gaelic but some ability in the language.

I have no set field myself of work, I started working originally for local government body in Dundee and then moved to Arbroath working directly with individuals with Mental Health issues so I suppose Health care would be my area of work I've worked in the past.

I'm not having a go either,

Cheers for the info Neoni again. If things go well on the Intro course it sounds like SMO is the place to be :D

Sjáumst líka, þú skilur íslensku? Frábær

neoni
Posts: 634
Joined: Sun Oct 28, 2007 10:57 pm
Corrections: I'm fine either way
Location: am badeigin

Unread postby neoni » Fri Jan 04, 2008 1:07 am

nei, ég tala ekki íslensku.

i will learn though - one day... :P

Gràisg
Rianaire
Posts: 1546
Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2007 6:04 pm
Language Level: Caran robach sna laithean seo
Location: Inbhir Narann
Contact:

Unread postby Gràisg » Fri Jan 04, 2008 12:37 pm

Gur matha a thèid leat a Chaoimhin - Good luck.

Frankly I beleive that outside of teaching most jobs available would go to someone with the requisite language skills regardless of whether they had a degree in the language or not.

There's no doubt that Sabhal Mòr is the place if you want a gaelic environment but it is worth noting that some native speakers and learners head for the mainland universities and will double up Gaelic with another subject to maximise their employment potential after their studies.

One look at the CNAG page that Niall mentioned will demonstrate however, that there are not a massive amount of jobs available in Gaelic at the moment. Hopefully that will improve as Bòrd na Gàidhlig continues its work but their are no guarantees (again unless you want to be a teacher), so it is better to enter the process of learning Gaelic as a life-enrichening experience and if you manage to eventually find work in the language then that will be great but bear in mind in won't all be plain sailing.

It is a pity that most of the 60,000 gaelic speakers that remain have never had the chance to make living in their own language instead of English but let's hope that changes, it is one of the things that has to really, if Gaelic is to survive as a language of community.

User avatar
Coinneach Cìr
Rianaire
Posts: 333
Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2007 4:07 pm
Language Level: Fileanta
Corrections: I'm fine either way
Location: Siorrachd Rinn Friù
Contact:

Unread postby Coinneach Cìr » Fri Jan 04, 2008 1:08 pm

Oh well its nice to see folk are making good use of the jobs page which I update faithfully every Thursday when I'm in the office!
Speaking personally what annoys me about the positions available is that so often there are only high level and specialised posts vacant, I think it can be hard for a learner / less experienced person to break into the Gaelic jobs market.

neoni
Posts: 634
Joined: Sun Oct 28, 2007 10:57 pm
Corrections: I'm fine either way
Location: am badeigin

Unread postby neoni » Fri Jan 04, 2008 4:06 pm

Gràisg wrote:There's no doubt that Sabhal Mòr is the place if you want a gaelic environment but it is worth noting that some native speakers and learners head for the mainland universities and will double up Gaelic with another subject to maximise their employment potential after their studies.


this is true. there's lots of people here this year - and i gather that it has been quite common in other years - for people to just come for an cùrsa comais, and then go on to another uni after that.

Níall Beag
Posts: 1333
Joined: Sun Sep 23, 2007 6:58 pm
Language Level: Chan eil gaidhlig agam agus cha bhi
Location: Dún Èideann, Alba
Contact:

Unread postby Níall Beag » Fri Jan 04, 2008 6:36 pm

It's quite understandable that people only turn up for a year, really. I mean, you don't need a degree in English to work in a job that requires English. In fact, as the SMO website says that An Cùrsa Comais and Adhartais equip students to attain a level of fluency which may enable them to gain employment in the Gaelic sector.

Better than looking at www.smo.uhi.ac.uk, trying going to the main site: http://www.uhi.ac.uk. The UHI have campuses all over the highlands and islands offering a wide range of courses. The Cùrsa Comais is not restricted to the SMO -- according to the website, you can also study it at Inverness College (have they still got lecturers?); Lews Castle College (Lewis) and Lochaber College (Fort William).

I haven't looked too deeply into the awards structure or the options w/ regard to full vs part time, but you may be better looking at doing a degree or diploma related to a particular area of work (eg healthcare) and combining that with parallel study of Gaelic.

I don't know much about the Gaelic tr*nsl*t**n market, but internationally tr*nsl*t**n is seen as a very specialist field. Not only are you generally expected to have at least one degree, but it is normal only to get work tr*nsl*t*ng to your mother tongue, and most tr*nsl*t**n work in Gaelic is likely to be from English to Gaelic, so I wouldn't personally see that as a viable goal.


The degrees the SMO offers are honours in Gaelic Language and Culture, Gaelic and North Atlantic Studies and Gaelic and Media Studies, and they have an ordinary degree in Gaelic and Traditional Music. Of these, only one, Media, points to a specific career path and the UK graduate market is currently flooded with non-specialised grads (who end up as managers for Lidl and McDonalds), so you may be best trying to chose a direction to head in.

I'm not trying to scare you or anything. If in doubt, there's not much to be lost by spending a year on An Cùrsa Comais....

Caoimhin.MacGilliosa
Posts: 60
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2008 2:01 pm
Language Level: Beginner
Location: Aonghas, Alba

Unread postby Caoimhin.MacGilliosa » Sat Jan 05, 2008 3:24 am

Thanks for the tips folks and conversations,

I'm going to do the distance learnin to get my first grips in Gaelic.

The SNP have just pumped 8million into Gaelic, the language is beautiful and will survive I truly believe. :D

Neoni - Þú skrífar mjög vel á íslensku, ég veit það þú ert íslensk :D

góða skemmtum

Neoni - you write good icelandic, I think your are one :D joke,
have a good time.

sorry for bringing icelandic onto this forum

User avatar
Coinneach Cìr
Rianaire
Posts: 333
Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2007 4:07 pm
Language Level: Fileanta
Corrections: I'm fine either way
Location: Siorrachd Rinn Friù
Contact:

Unread postby Coinneach Cìr » Sat Jan 05, 2008 8:44 am

Caoimhin.MacGilliosa wrote:sorry for bringing icelandic onto this forum

No apology necessary especially seeing as we're in the Gun Chuspair area. Just don't do it too often to prevent me feeling inferior by being unable to participate :lol:

User avatar
GunChleoc
Rianaire
Posts: 4434
Joined: Mon Sep 17, 2007 11:26 am
Language Level: Mion-chùiseach
Corrections: Please correct my grammar
Location: Dùthaich mo chridhe
Contact:

Unread postby GunChleoc » Mon Jan 07, 2008 11:53 am

Dhomhsa, faodaidh tu cànan sam bith a chleachdadh an-seo - bi modhail, co-dhiù, tha online tr*nsl*t*r agam :spors:

For me you can use any language here - but be polite, I have an online tr*nsl*t*r (abair droch Bheurla a th' agam an-diugh)
Oileanach chànan chuthachail
Na dealbhan agam