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Posted: Wed Feb 20, 2008 11:18 am
by yellow-ceitidh
Coinneach Cìr wrote:
yellow-ceitidh wrote:then realized that TY misses out the 'mi' in 'Tha mi gu math', making it 'Tha gu math'. :?
Is that a problem? You'll very often hear the 'mi' dropped by speakers referring to themselves and now that I think on it I wouldn't consider it too unnatural for someone to answer a question referring to someone else in such a manner as long as there was no ambiguity re who was being referred to;

"Ciamar a tha thu a Choinnich?"
"Tha sgìth / toilichte / tinn / gu dòigheil"


Although if my ageing brain serves me correctly I read somewhere 'mi' is the only one that should be dropped in this manner.
It didn't explain it though, and I've been confused about that for a long time, thanks for explaining it. :D

Posted: Wed Feb 20, 2008 11:43 pm
by Coinneach Cìr
yellow-ceitidh wrote:It didn't explain it though, and I've been confused about that for a long time, thanks for explaining it. :D
Tha sin ceart gu leòr! :D

That's not a problem

Posted: Sun Mar 09, 2008 6:58 pm
by *Alasdair*

Posted: Wed Apr 02, 2008 9:22 pm
by deardron
Coinneach Cìr wrote:You'll very often hear the 'mi' dropped by speakers referring to themselves and now that I think on it I wouldn't consider it too unnatural for someone to answer a question referring to someone else in such a manner as long as there was no ambiguity re who was being referred to;

"Ciamar a tha thu a Choinnich?"
"Tha sgìth / toilichte / tinn / gu dòigheil"


Although if my ageing brain serves me correctly I read somewhere 'mi' is the only one that should be dropped in this manner.
It's looks like it's quite the same thing as when you omit 'I' in English, i.e. hope, don't know, wish etc.

Posted: Thu Apr 03, 2008 5:30 pm
by *Alasdair*
July now...

Somehow i doubt we will ever see this...

Posted: Mon Apr 07, 2008 1:38 pm
by Níall Beag
deardron wrote:
Coinneach Cìr wrote:You'll very often hear the 'mi' dropped by speakers referring to themselves and now that I think on it I wouldn't consider it too unnatural for someone to answer a question referring to someone else in such a manner as long as there was no ambiguity re who was being referred to;

"Ciamar a tha thu a Choinnich?"
"Tha sgìth / toilichte / tinn / gu dòigheil"


Although if my ageing brain serves me correctly I read somewhere 'mi' is the only one that should be dropped in this manner.
It's looks like it's quite the same thing as when you omit 'I' in English, i.e. hope, don't know, wish etc.
Not quite.

In English you would not hear an exchange like this:
How are you?
Am good.

In Scots we might reply Aye, guid (=Yes, good), even though it's not a yes/no question.
The Gaelic form above seems more like the Scots pattern than the English "missing I".

Posted: Mon Apr 07, 2008 3:25 pm
by eideard
In English you would not hear an exchange like this:
How are you?
Am good.

No, but you definitely will hear "How are you ? " "Good, thanks." And if you're in the southern US you'll also hear "A 'm good." :D

Posted: Tue Apr 08, 2008 8:11 pm
by Cèid
eideard wrote: And if you're in the southern US you'll also hear "A 'm good."
:? Nonsense. I've lived in the South for over 20 years, and I've never hear anyone say that. Southern Americans say "I'm good," as well as "I'm fine" (which is more common) and "I'm doing good/well/fine," usually followed by "thanks" or "thank you" because Southerners still value politeness as well as forming complete sentences. (A side note: While some wanna-be grammaticians might quibble over whether "I'm good" is "proper" English, actually it's prefectly fine, seeing in colloquial American English, one says "I'm well" to refer more specifically to one's present state of physical health. "I'm good/fine" or "I'm doing well/good/fine" are used more to express mood, mental/emotional state, or state of personal circumstances.)

Sorry, but while I'm not a native Southerner, I've come to have a lot of respect for them and for how well they have preserved "good" English in their colloquial speech, despite the common stereotypes about them or how other people consciously or unconsciously "mishear" Southerners due to their own personal biases.


Back to the topic: while it's great they're coming out (eventually) with a new learner's book, what I would really like to see is more intermediate materials available.

Posted: Mon Apr 28, 2008 8:07 pm
by *Alasdair*
An t-Iuchar 15mh a-nis...
July 15th.

Posted: Mon May 12, 2008 8:16 pm
by *Alasdair*
An t-Sultain a-nis...
September now...

Posted: Tue May 13, 2008 3:01 pm
by Níall Beag
As I understand it, this doesn't indicate an intention to withdraw the book. I recall hearing (perhaps from our resident bookseller) that "low order" books get shuffled backwards routinely when demand for a popular title increases. No point resetting the presses for a couple of thousand Gaelic books when there's demand for a couple of hundred thousand Booker Prize winners!

This book'll probably appear when there's a bit of a lull in the bestsellers.

Posted: Tue May 20, 2008 7:34 pm
by Rù-ra
The hold-up is apparently due to major delays with the final proof-reading. They are still waiting, and can't go to print until it has been properly proof-read.

Posted: Tue Jul 15, 2008 12:23 am
by *Alasdair*
15mh an t-Sultain a-nis.

A dh'aithgearr!

15th Sept.
Soon!

Posted: Tue Jul 15, 2008 6:51 am
by Rù-ra
The book is now ready, but they are still trying to find someone to do the recordings for the CD. So far, everyone they have asked either says no or is too busy to do the recordings straight away.

Posted: Tue Jul 15, 2008 12:56 pm
by *Alasdair*
Rù-ra wrote:The book is now ready, but they are still trying to find someone to do the recordings for the CD. So far, everyone they have asked either says no or is too busy to do the recordings straight away.
Since you seem to have insider knowledge, are they planning on distributing the book on its own first, then the CD version later?