Urgent t*ns Request

Thèid a h-uile iarrtais eadar-theangachaidh air imrich a-bhos an-seo. Ma bhios thu seachd sgìth dhaibh, na rach ann an-seo.
MikeSz
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Urgent t*ns Request

Unread post by MikeSz »

Hello all,

I am hoping someone can provide me with a tr*nsl*t**n of the phrase "Until you (pl) meet again under the Lantern" - it is for a eulogy for a friend's father who is a Macfarlane, hence the reference to the 'lantern' (i.e. Macfarlane's lantern - a local term for the full moon).

Thanks very much!

I believe in Irish it is something like - Go gasfar le chéile sibh arís "faoi an lóchrann...."


akerbeltz
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Unread post by akerbeltz »

LOL wrong language.

"Gus an coinnich sibh a-rithist fon lanntair"

will do the trick.
MikeSz
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Unread post by MikeSz »

Yeah - I know wrong language!

Thanks very much for the Scots (correct :) ) version!!!
Seonaidh
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Unread post by Seonaidh »

Was not the original in Scots?
MikeSz
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Unread post by MikeSz »

The "original" I posted was in Irish. I was looking for the Scots version/tr*nsl*t**n.
Seonaidh
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Unread post by Seonaidh »

"Go gasfar le chéile sibh arís "faoi an lóchrann"

?Gae gas-fire the ceilidh sae Harris fae a licht?

No - I was thinking "Until you (pl) meet again under the Lantern" was in Scots.
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Unread post by Thrissel »

Wouldn't it be youz in Scots?
Níall Beag
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Unread post by Níall Beag »

Thrissel wrote:Wouldn't it be youz in Scots?
That a depends on whit ye cry "Scots".

"Yous/youz" is affy modern and mair nor a wee bit weegie. (It wis brocht in by the latest brood o Gallick an Erse speakers in Glasgow wha wantit somethin tae mak up for no bein able tae say "Sibh".) But then again, Ah ay said it when Ah wis wee, an ah'm no fae the weege....

MikeSz,

What they're getting at is that "Scots" is the name of an Anglic language, closely related to English, that has traditionally been spoken throughout the south and east of Scotland for around a thousand years (first introduced to the Lothians circa 600). "Scottish Gaelic" is something very different, and it's incorrect to call it "Scots". (You wouldn't call English "Irish", even though it's spoken in Ireland, because there's already a language called Irish.)

If you have a look at everything I wrote before your name, you'll see that it's relatively easy to get the gist of it for an English speaker, similar to how a Danish speaker can read most Swedish, even if he sometimes can't understand things said out loud.
MikeSz
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Unread post by MikeSz »

Oh, sorry - DUH!!! I completley get it now - and I should know better as I am also a big fan of "Scots" (i.e. so-called Hiberno-English. Lalands, etc., etc.) !! :naire:
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Unread post by Níall Beag »

Och, no...

Hiberno-English is Irish, not Scottish, descended from the English spoken by English invaders during the 17th century.

Scots is descended from Northumbrian, an Anglo-Saxon dialect that was altered by invasion and settlement by the Danish Vikings between 800 and 954 AD. After centuries of conquest and counter-conquest, Northumbria was eventually split, with the northern part becoming part of Scotland (the Lothians and Borders regions are historically Northumbrian) in 1018. A very different language indeed.

Just to muddy the waters, there were later Scottish settlements in Ireland, but that gave rise to the dialect of Scots known as Ulster-Scots or Ullans (silly name), which bears little relation to the Hiberno-English dialect(s) of English.
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Unread post by Seonaidh »

Uill, tha "Hibs" a' cluiche ann an Dùn Èideann nach eil?

17mh linn? Dè mu dheidhinn "Yola", seòrsa Beurla a bhruidhneadh ann an ceann a deas Laighean bhon 12mh linn gus an 19mh linn? Biodh sin air buaidh a thoirt air a' Bheurla nas ùire, chreidinn.
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Unread post by Níall Beag »

According to experts, Hiberno-English has very clear parallels with the Early Modern English of the time in places like Plymouth where many of the settlers came from. Yola was descended from Early Middle English and was very very different.
Seonaidh
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Unread post by Seonaidh »

Cha toi leam deasbad mun Bheurla air an fhòram seo, ach tha adhbharan agam airson smaoineachadh nach eil thu ceart an sin.
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